Category Archives: Borrowing and Lending eBooks

Can you use your Kindle for library books?

Library BooksThere was an interesting thread this morning on Amazon’s Kindle forums concerning library use and e-ink Kindles. According to the opening post, “Many libraries are switching to 3M Cloud and using Axis 360 ditching Overdrive.”

The poster’s complaint is relevant because the 3M Cloud is not compatible with e-ink Kindles, only the Kindle Fire.  At at the bottom of 3m’s list of compatible devices, it says:

The 3M Cloud Library is not currently supported by Amazon. If you would like compatibility with your Kindle device not indicated above, please contact

However, the forum posts go on to point out that the problem with 3M is not Amazon’s. It goes on to note that 3M was created as a partnership between Penguin. the New York Public Library and 3M with the intention of creating a system that didn’t support the Kindle.  (Nate from the Digital Reader wrote an article about this back in 2012.)

Both Axis 360 and 3M are said to be cheaper for libraries than current Overdrive prices. It seems that some libraries use Overdrive along with one of the other systems, while other libraries are choosing with one over the other. For libraries who switch to 3M or Axis 360, patrons with an e-ink Kindle are left out in the cold.

Understandably, avid library users who own e-these unsupported devices aren’t happy.

Obviously, 3M and Axis 360 have been available for quite some time now. This thread made me wonder if library patrons are starting to see their libraries shift to other e-book providers.

Does anyone have any experience with this? What is your library using to lend ebooks? Have they changed systems? Please share in the comments. :)


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Daily Links : A new Harry Potter story

From Lifehacker, Spot a boring Kindle Book by looking at popular highlights.

JK Rowling post a new Harry Potter background story on Pottermore, from The Digital Reader

From Teleread, Almost a year with Scribd. Has anything changed with my reading?

Whispersync comes to the UK with 10 freebies, from The Ebook Reader.

From ReadWrite, In exposing followers, Medium fails readers.

As part of Amazon’s Daily Deals, there are 12 award winning Sci-fi deals,  including books by Octavia Butler, Harlan Ellison and John Brunner for only $1.99 each.

Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news.


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Filed under Borrowing and Lending eBooks, Daily Deals and Bargains, Daily Links, E-book Find of the Day, Free, News, Subscription

Daily Links: 90% of Public Libraries now lend e-books

From Digital Book World, American Library Association announces 90% of Public Libraries now lend e-books.

From a story in Publishers Weekly, Comixolgy to offer  DRM-free backup copies.

And a couple of e-book finds of the day from my TBR list in the Daily Deals: one of John Brunner’s fascinating SF titles, The Shockwave Rider, and, Midsummer Moon, a humoruous romance by Laura Kinsale (one with a hedgehog, no less!).

Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news.

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Filed under Borrowing and Lending eBooks, Comics and Graphic Novels, Daily Deals and Bargains, E-book Find of the Day, Kitchen sink, Library

The future of the library and the great content divide

As someone who tweets a great deal about public libraries, this article from TheDigitalShift, Ebook Strategy and Public Libraries: Slow Just Won’t Work Anymore,  speaks volumes.

The article addresses many of the important issues at the heart of the library ebook problem such as Overdrive’s monopoly and publisher’s refusals to sell ebooks because of fears of the library model. But it is the following paragraph which presents a truly terrifying scenario:

The perfect storm formula of a monopolistic environment and the actions (or more accurately, the deliberate inaction) of publishers have resulted in the creation of a significant shift in public policy in this country. After more than 100 years of public libraries circulating materials to users, we are no longer able to provide access to critical content that now exists in digital form. As a result, two very distinct scenarios are emerging in the communities we serve. Affluent users in prosperous neighborhoods have universal broadband access, numerous ebook hosting devices, and a credit card with the disposable income to acquire whatever content they want. Low-income residents in poorer neighborhoods do not have this sequence of resources and run the risk of not being able to access digital content that will allow them to fairly participate, compete and contribute to the digital economy/world. This content divide goes against the very principles that attracted so many of us to this profession –supporting democracy by providing access to information in the broadest possible context.

The issues so succinctly raised in this article are ones that all of us, as a society, should be very, very concerned about.There is much more in the full article, including suggestions about how to work towards a solution. If you care about public libraries, this is a must read article!

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Filed under Borrowing and Lending eBooks, eBook Rights, Kitchen sink, Library

Norway’s National Library Digital Newspaper Service

Here’s an interesting article on Norway’s National Library digital newspaper service. Seeing models like this one work is heartening, especially as we are looking towards digital models here in the US!

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Filed under Kitchen sink, Library, The eReading Experience

Hey, Muggles! Soon, you can borrow Harry Potter on your Kindle!

Amazon announced today that all 7 Harry Potter books would be available in the Kindles Owners Lending library as of June 19, 2012.

According to Amazon’s press release:

 Owning a Kindle just got a whole lot better for magic-loving Muggles. Starting June 19, (NASDAQ:AMZN) is adding all seven Harry Potter books (in English, French, Italian, German and Spanish) to the Kindle Owners’Lending Library (KOLL). Harry Potter is the all-time best-selling book series in history, andAmazon has purchased an exclusive license from J.K. Rowling’s Pottermore to make the addition of these titles possible. The Kindle Owners’Lending Library is a benefit of Amazon Prime membership—Prime members also enjoy free two-day shipping on millions of items and unlimited streaming of more than 17,000 movies and TV episodes. The Kindle Owners’Lending Libraryhas now grown to over 145,000 books that can be borrowed for free as frequently as once a month, with no due dates.

“We’re absolutely delighted to have reached this agreement with Pottermore. This is the kind of significant investment in the Kindle ecosystem that we’ll continue to make on behalf of Kindle owners,” saidJeff Bezos, founder and CEO “Over a year, borrowing the Harry Potter books, plus a handful of additional titles, can alone be worth more than the$79cost of Prime or a Kindle. The Kindle Owners’Lending Libraryalso has an innovative feature that’s of great benefit for popular titles like Harry Potter – unlimited supply of each title – you never get put on a waiting list.

This is an exclusive deal between Amazon and Pottermore.

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News Bits and Bytes for February 9, 2012

Lots of news happening today:

Reports are saying that E-ink revenues are down for the month of January. A lot. However, downloads of digital media jumped in 2011. 

A big shake-up in the library lending world today. Penguin is terminating their agreement with Overdrive to supply library books. With Harper Collins still only offering libraries the crippleware 26 loan contract for books, Random House is essentially the only Big Six supplier of library books. If you pay attention to the subtext in the article about the meeting between publishers and the American Library Association, this should not come as too much of a surprise, unfortunately.

If you have been following the reaction to Amazon’s foray into the publishing world, the responses are still coming in. Today, Indie Commerce joins Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million and Indigo in boycotting Amazon titles. Interestingly, this article from Paid Content says they’re not – well not exactly, that is.

Mike Shatzkin has a very thoughtful take on the Amazon vs Barnes & Noble saga that I highly recommend reading!

And finally, from  Evo Terra (Podiobooks) and Jeff Moriarty’s “It Isn’t Rocket Surgery” broadcast, a rather extreme point of view on the quality of self-published ebooks on Here’s the video:

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Filed under Borrowing and Lending eBooks, Daily Links, Library, The Book Industry, Video