Daily Links and Deals: 6,000 Historical Children’s Books, All Digitized and Free to Read Online

daily_links_1Today, a collection of free children’s books online. Also, what happens when you lend someone your phone and they break it? You can get free books and WiFi on the NY subway and the FCC decides not to appeal the municipal broadband ruling.

Daily Links for Tuesday, August 30, 2016:

The etiquette of breaking someone’s phone, and having your phone broken (The Next Web) Food for thought here. How do you deal with this?

Enter an Archive of 6,000 Historical Children’s Books, All Digitized and Free to Read Online (Open Culture) Many of the free books we find are not appropriate for children. Most of these are read online, not downloadable.

New York subway is offering free ebooks (and Wi-Fi) for your commute (Tech Crunch) I say “meh.” While the short reads might be nice, extended excerpts are just samples under another name.

FCC admits defeat in municipal broadband, won’t appeal court loss (Ars Technica) It is over for now, although the FCC is not ruling out other options. This is disappointing.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Fallen: A Cassidy & Spenser Thriller (Cassidy & Spenser Thrillers Book 2) by Carey Baldwin.

In Today’s Deals, a Belkin 3-Outlet SurgePlus Mini Travel Swivel Charger Surge Protector with Dual USB Ports (I have these; they are great!).

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is The Taco Cleanse: The Tortilla-Based Diet Proven to Change Your Life by Wes Allison, Stephanie Bogdanich, Molly R. Frisinger, Jessica Morris. The Romance Daily Find is One Night: Promised by Jodi Ellen Malpas.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Only Time Will Tell (The Clifton Chronicles Book 1) by Jeffrey Archer. The Extra Daily Deal is Summer Island by Kristin Hannah. There is also a selection of Great Reads Under $5 and Bargain Reads in Fiction, in Mystery and other genres.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes The Passage by Justin Cronin.

Google Books has a selection of Hot Book Deals.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

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Daily Links and Deals: Modernizing our voting procedures to reflect 21st century realities

daily_links_1Today, an interesting opinion piece on modernizing the election process. Also, tips to clear space on your Android phone, the Jetsons and a century of technological change and an unusual shaped phone. In deals, you can find luggage sets, Casio watches and 3M hearing protectors (we actually use these around our house). Also, the clock is running out for Father’s Day delivery in the Amazon device sale.

Daily Links for Wednesday, June 15, 2016:

6 quick ways to clear space on an overstuffed Android device (PC World) This may help if you have too much stuff on your phone.

Judy Jetson voice actress saw a century of wild technological change (CNET) A R.I.P for a talented actress and an interesting look at the technological changes in the last hundred years.

Monohm’s wonderfully weird circular phone is now available for preorder (The Verge) This is really cute…. but I just can’t see myself using it as a phone.

Modernizing our voting procedures to reflect 21st century realities (Techcrunch) Would you like to see online voting implemented? How do you do it so we ensure universal access and honesty and accountability?

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Whistling Women by Kelly Romo for $1.99.

In Today’s Deals, get up to 70% off luggage sets, messenger bags and more. Also, Casio Men’s Pathfinder watches starting at $99 and deals on select 3M hearing protectors.

Looking for an device for a Father’s Day gift? The Amazon device sale is still offering savings.. There’s just a few more days to order in time for delivery by June 19th.  Here’s what you can find:

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Unrivaled by Alyson Noël for $2.99. The Romance Daily Find is The Beekeeper’s Son by Kelly Irvin for $1.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is also Unrivaled by Alyson Noel for $2.99. The Extra Daily Deal is The Coming Home Series Boxed Set
by Meli Raine for 99 cents.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Rotten Gods by Greg Barron for $1.99.

Google has a selection of Hot Deals This Week.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: Library usage falls 14.3 percentage points since 2005

daily_links_1Today, a story about library usage falling, bad security features in Samsung’s Smart Home line and tips to keep your phone battery working for the whole day. In deals, there are savings on two Anker items, a bluetooth speaker with mic and a Qi charging pad.

Daily Links for day, May 2, 2016:

7 ways to keep your dying Android phone or iPhone alive (PC World) Great tips to help your phone’s battery keep up with you.

Even your connected car will need antivirus software (Techcrunch) First we had to re-boot our cars, now we are gonna have to virus check them?

Samsung Smart Home flaws let hackers make keys to front door (Ars Technica) A smart home is not necessarily a secure home.

Library usage falls 14.3 percentage points since 2005 (The Bookseller) Does this take into account digital visits as well as physical ones. Many people tell me they are using the library rather than pay high publisher’s prices.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Assassin’s Heart by Sarah Ahiers for $1.99.

In Today’s Deals,there are several Anker product deals: the Anker SoundCore Bluetooth Speaker with Built-in Mic and an Anker Wireless Charger PowerPort Qi Wireless Charging Pad.

Mother’s Day is less than a week away! Amazon has some great deals on both e-ink Kindles and Fire tablets:

First, in e-ink Kindles, you can get $20 off the Kindle, Kindle Paperwhite and the Kindle for Kids bundle. 

There are several promotions on Fire tablets. The 7″ Fire (normally $49.99) is only still only $39.99. Amazon is also offering savings on the Fire HD 6 (8GB and 16 GB versions) and the Fire HD 10 is $50 off for a limited time. There are also still deals on pre-owned Fire tablets.

And, yes, I am also still seeing the option for 5 payments of $58 for the Kindle Oasis pre-order. Current delivery date is June 1, 2016.

Time is almost up on the trade-in offer from Amazon on your old Fire tablet.  Trade-in must be completed by May 9, 2016.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is The Darwin Elevator by Jason M. Hough for $1.99. The Romance Daily Find is Eye Candy by Katherine Garbera for 99 cents.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is His Wicked Games Boxed Set: A Cunningham Family Bundle (Books 1, 2, and 2.5) by Ember Casey for $1.99.

And, you can still get $20 off the Kobo Glo HD.  Free shipping is included but I am not sure about a Mother’s Day delivery at this point. 😦

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes For the Sins of My Father: A Mafia Killer, His Son, and the Legacy of Mob Life by Albert DeMeo for $1.99.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Your devices’ latest feature? They can spy on your every move

phoneBy H V Jagadish, University of Michigan

We now have dozens of smart devices in our houses and even on our bodies. They improve our lives in so many ways – from lowering energy consumption in our homes to egging us on to be active.

But these smart devices respond to whatever commands they are given: we’ve had security experts demonstrate how cars can be hijacked remotely and medical devices in your body can be hacked and turned into lethal weapons. These risks are now well-recognized by technology developers, and there is a great deal of excellent work going on toward how to avoid them.

But there are other dangers we should be more concerned about that are getting less attention. Your gadgets could be providing a window that any hacker could see right through to spy on you.

Your stuff is surveilling you

Your laptop has a video camera built into it. When it’s recording, a little green light blinks on so you’re aware you’re being recorded. But it can be instructed to videotape your activities without the green camera light being on. And this is not just an in-laboratory warning of a hypothetical danger; it has actually been done, by over-eager school officials and by peeping Toms.

At least you can turn off your laptop: when it is shut, the camera can see only “the other side” of the laptop. But this quick fix doesn’t apply to sound recording devices, like microphones. For example, your phone could listen to conversations in the room even when it appears to be off. So could your TV, or other smart appliances in your home. Some gadgets – such as Amazon’s Echo – are explicitly designed to be voice activated and constantly at the ready to act on your spoken commands.

It’s not just audio and video recording we need to be concerned about. Your smart home monitor knows how many people are in your house and in which rooms at what times. Your smart water meter knows every time a toilet is flushed in your home. Your alarm clock knows what time you woke up each day last month. Your refrigerator knows every time you filled a glass of cold water. Your cellphone has a GPS built into it that can track your location, and hence record your movements. Yes, you can turn off location tracking, but does that mean the phone isn’t keeping track of your location? And do you really know for sure your GPS is off simply because your phone’s screen says it is? At the very least, your service provider knows where you are based on the cellphone towers your phone is communicating with.

We all love our smart gadgets. But beyond the convenience factor, the fact that our devices are networked means they can communicate in ways we don’t want them to, in addition to all the ways that we do.

Is this thing on?
Amazon.com, Inc

Next generation wiretapping

A bad actor could figure out how to take control of any of these technologies to learn private information about you. But maybe even more worryingly, could your technology provider become, voluntarily or under compulsion, a party to a scheme through which you unwittingly reveal your secrets?

The recent battle between Apple and the FBI revolved around the feds’ request that Apple develop a custom insecure version of iOS, the operating system of the iPhone, to facilitate their hacking into a terrorist’s cell phone. Is breaking into a locked phone just the next step beyond a traditional wiretap in which the government asks an Apple or a Samsung to use its technology to bug the conversations of a suspected terrorist?

But modern phones can be used to do a lot more than listen in on conversations. Could companies be asked to keep location tracking on while indicating to the suspect that it is really off? It would seem to me hard to draw a line between these cases. No wonder some Apple engineers came out as “objectors of conscience” in the Apple-FBI matter. This case was dropped before Apple could be compelled to do anything, so there’s no legal precedent to guide us on how these next-step examples would play out in court.

It is, of course, valuable for law enforcement to monitor criminal suspects, to investigate ongoing criminal behavior and to collect evidence to prosecute. This is the motive behind wiretap laws that allow law enforcement to listen to your phone conversations with no notice to you.

Wiretaps actually got their start in the 1800s as tools of corporate espionage. In 1928, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Olmstead v. U.S. that it was constitutional for law enforcement to use wiretaps, and that warrants weren’t required. This decision was superseded only in 1967, by Katz v. U.S., which established a citizen’s right to privacy, and required law enforcement to obtain warrants before bugging a phone conversation. This was long after Congress had passed an act carefully restricting wiretaps, in 1934.

In the early days of wiretapping, there was a physical “tap” – a side connection – that could be applied to a real wire carrying the conversation. Newer technologies eventually permitted the telephone company to encode and multiplex many telephone calls on the same physical wire.

Technology has moved on, but the law isn’t clear yet.
Gawler History, CC BY-SA

In the United States, the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) was passed by Congress in 1994, due to worries about law enforcement’s ability to keep up with new communications technologies. It requires communication companies to provide a way for law enforcement to place a wiretap even on newer communication technologies.

The law explicitly exempted information services, such as email. This legal differentiation between communications technologies and information services means companies are obliged to help the government listen in on your phone calls (with a warrant) but are not obliged to help it read your email messages (at least on account of this specific law).

In 2004, the Federal Communications Commission ruled that services such as Voice Over IP (think Skype) were communications services covered by CALEA, and not exempt information services.

Some have since wanted to further broaden this law, and doubtless the Apple FBI dispute brings this issue to the forefront again. Law enforcement will presumably push for greater surveillance powers, and civil liberty advocates will resist.

Nothing to hide?

Perhaps you don’t care about the privacy of criminals. But note that surveillance is not just of known bad actors, but also of suspected bad actors.

History teaches us that lists of suspects can sometimes be drawn way too broadly. You may remember the McCarthy era and J. Edgar Hoover’s reign at the FBI, which infamously included bugging Martin Luther King Jr.’s bedroom. Even today, there are attempts by the British Government Communications Headquarters to monitor everyone who visited the Wikileaks website, even just to browse. Some laws don’t make sense or aren’t fair, so even some “criminals” may still deserve privacy.

And it’s not just law enforcement overreach we have to worry about. Technologies like Finspy are commercially available today to install malware on your computer or phone and “recruit” it to spy on you. Such technologies could be used by anyone, including the “bad actors,” without the cooperation of your device manufacturer or service provider.

Wiretap laws, such as CALEA, apply to explicit communication actions taken by someone, such as actually making a phone call. Wiretaps do not track your movements in the house, they do not listen to your conversations when you are not on the phone, they do not videotape you in your bathroom – but these are all actions our various devices are now capable of performing. With the proliferation of devices in our lives, it is certainly possible to use them for surveillance purposes. There’s no question that by doing so, authorities will catch many bad actors. But there will also be a huge price to pay in terms of privacy and possibly wrongful arrests.

Finally, this may feel futuristic, but I assure you it is not. The FBI was already using a cellphone microphone to eavesdrop on organized crime as long as a decade ago. Commercial interests are not too far behind in doing much the same, with the purpose of targeting a better sales pitch.

Our omnipresent networked devices raise big questions that we should openly debate. How we balance these costs and benefits will determine the type of society we live in.The Conversation

H V Jagadish, Bernard A Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Reposted under a Creative Commons license.

Daily Links and Deals: OverDrive Adds 500 New Publishers to Global Ebook Catalog

daily_links_1In today’s links,OverDrive adds new publishers, music labels are furious at YouTube, and a look at how personalization of the internet makes it smaller. In today’s deals, 99 cent African American ebooks, bluetooth headphones and several retailer promotions.

Daily Links for Tuesday, April 12, 2016:

Here’s why the music labels are furious at YouTube – Again. (Recode) It’s is time for contract renegotiations and labels want to see a different result this time around.

Google will now warn users when websites host deceptive ‘social engineering’ ads (Techcrunch) This is a good thing.

First Click: The small ‘i’ internet (The Verge) Does the personalization experience make the internet smaller?

New York bill would have police scan your phone after a crash (Engadget)  You’d have to submit to a ‘textalyzer’ to see if texting led to your accident.

OverDrive Adds 500 New Publishers to Global Ebook Catalog (DBW) New features include enhanced ebooks and right-to-left reading support for languages like Arabic and Hebrew.

More Than 25 African American E-Books Available Now For Just 99 Cents Each — But Only For One Day! (Black News) Today only; books are normally $2.99.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes best-selling Legacy of Kings (Blood of Gods and Royals) by Eleanor Herman for $1.99.

In Today’s Deals, find BÖHM Wireless Bluetooth Headphones, savings of $15 on a Fire Essentials Bundle and an iPhone 5/5S Battery Case included in the offerings.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Academy X: A Novel by Andrew Trees for $1.99. The Romance Daily Find is An Affair to Dismember: The Matchmaker Series by Elise Sax for $1.99.

B and N also has a coupon special where you can  get $15 off when you spend over $50. Details and coupon code here.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Finding Jake A Novel by Bryan Reardon for 99 cents.

You can still get free shipping on any Kobo e-reader through April 13, 2016. And, until April 18, select Romantic Times winners & nominees are on sale for under $3.daily_links_1

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Burglars Can’t Be Choosers (#1 Bernie Rhodenbarr series) by Lawrence Block for $3.99.

Google has a selection of Limited Time Deals that includes Midnight Crossroad, the first in the new series by Sookie Stackhouse author Charlaine Harris for $1.99.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

CES Roundup 1-7-2016

CES_Logo_smToday’s interesting stories from CES 2016 for January 7, 2016:

Solar grill adds component for nighttime cooking (hands on) (CNET) – The survivalist in me wants want of these to go with my solar oven….

The Grillbot Is A Robot That Cleans Your Grill (Techcrunch) – I love grilling but hate cleaning the grill, this seems like a no-brainer.

Ily Aims To Be The New Home Phone That Keeps Your Family Connected (Techcrunch)- For families with young children without a landline, this is a great idea.

And finally:

U.S. Marshals Raid Hoverboard Booth at CES (Bloomberg) – I think this one says a lot about the times we live in.

No, I am not going to CES, but I love reading about the gadgets. I will be doing these roundup posts intermittently during the week. The official CES website is here.

Did you know that Amazon has a page for products from CES2016? You can find it here.