Public Domain Day 2019

For the last few years, I have written posts on January 1st talking about art, books, films and music that would have entered the public domain if those copyright terms had not been extended. Mainly due a corporation trying to protect the rights to a cartoon mouse, for an entire generation in the United States, no new material has fallen into the public domain. The fact that new material is FINALLY entering the public domain this year is a big deal and from here on out, every year, new works will fall into the public domain on a yearly basis.

The Public Domain belongs to the the people. The works contained within it are a part of our history and culture. When works fall into the public domain, many of these works suddenly reappear or are transformed into new art forms. So dig in; let’s see what’s in there, shall we? This is truly something to celebrate.

From Duke Law School’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain:

January 1, 2019 is (finally) Public Domain Day: Works from 1923 are open to all!

For the first time in over 20 years, on January 1, 2019, published works will enter the US public domain.1 Works from 1923 will be free for all to use and build upon, without permission or fee. They include dramatic films such as The Ten Commandments, and comedies featuring Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd. There are literary works by Robert Frost, Aldous Huxley, and Edith Wharton, the “Charleston” song, and more. And remember, this has not happened for over 20 years. Why? Works from 1923 were set to go into the public domain in 1999, after a 75-year copyright term. But in 1998 Congress hit a two-decade pause button and extended their copyright term for 20 years, giving works published between 1923 and 1977 an expanded term of 95 years.2

But now the drought is over. How will people celebrate this trove of cultural material? Google Books will offer the full text of books from that year, instead of showing only snippet views or authorized previews. The Internet Archive will add books, movies, music, and more to its online library. Community theaters are planning screenings of the films. Students will be free to adapt and publicly perform the music. Because these works are in the public domain, anyone can make them available, where you can rediscover and enjoy them. (Empirical studies have shown that public domain books are less expensive, available in more editions and formats, and more likely to be in print—see herehere, and here.) In addition, the expiration of copyright means that you’re free to use these materials, for education, for research, or for creative endeavors—whether it’s translating the books, making your own versions of the films, or building new music based on old classics.

Here are some of the works that will be entering the public domain in 2019. A fuller (but still partial) listing of over a thousand works that we have researched can be found here.

Films

  • Safety Last!, directed by Fred C. Newmeyer and Sam Taylor, featuring Harold Lloyd
  • The Ten Commandments, directed by Cecil B. DeMille
  • The Pilgrim, directed by Charlie Chaplin
  • Our Hospitality, directed by Buster Keaton and John G. Blystone
  • The Covered Wagon, directed by James Cruze
  • Scaramouche, directed by Rex Ingram

Books

  • Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan and the Golden Lion
  • Agatha Christie, The Murder on the Links
  • Winston S. Churchill, The World Crisis
  • e.e. cummings, Tulips and Chimneys
  • Robert Frost, New Hampshire
  • Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet
  • Aldous Huxley, Antic Hay
  • D.H. Lawrence, Kangaroo
  • Bertrand and Dora Russell, The Prospects of Industrial Civilization
  • Carl Sandberg, Rootabaga Pigeons
  • Edith Wharton, A Son at the Front
  • P.G. Wodehouse, works including The Inimitable Jeeves and Leave it to Psmith
  • Viginia Woolf, Jacob’s Room

Music

  • Yes! We Have No Bananas, w.&m. Frank Silver & Irving Cohn
  • Charleston, w.&m. Cecil Mack & James P. Johnson
  • London Calling! (musical), by Noel Coward
  • Who’s Sorry Now, w. Bert Kalmar & Harry Ruby, m. Ted Snyder
  • Songs by “Jelly Roll” Morton including Grandpa’s SpellsThe Pearls, and Wolverine Blues (w. Benjamin F. Spikes & John C. Spikes; m. Ferd “Jelly Roll” Morton)
  • Works by Bela Bartok including the Violin Sonata No. 1 and the Violin Sonata No. 2
  • Tin Roof Blues, m. Leon Roppolo, Paul Mares, George Brunies, Mel Stitzel, & Benny Pollack
(There were also compositions from 1923 by other well-known artists including Louis Armstrong, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, WC Handy, Oscar Hammerstein, Gustav Holst, Al Jolson, Jerome Kern, and John Phillip Sousa; though their most famous works were from other years.)

Of course, 1923 was a long time ago. (Under the 56-year copyright term that existed until 1978, we could be seeing works from 1962 enter the public domain in 2019.) Unfortunately, the fact that works from 1923 are legally available does not mean they are actually available. Many of these works are lost entirely or literally disintegrating (as with old films and recordings), evidence of what long copyright terms do to the conservation of cultural artifacts. For the works that have survived, however, their long-awaited entry into the public domain is still something to celebrate.

Technically, many works from 1923 may already have entered the public domain decades ago because the copyright owners did not comply with the “formalities” that used to be necessary for copyright protection. Back then, your work went into the public domain if you did not include a copyright notice—e.g. “Copyright 1923 Charlie Chaplin”—when publishing it, or if you did not renew the copyright after 28 years. Current copyright law no longer has these requirements. But, even though those works might technically be in the public domain, as a practical matter the public often has to assume they’re still copyrighted (or risk a lawsuit) because the relevant copyright information is difficult or impossible to find—older records can be fragmentary, confused, or lost. That’s why January 1, 2019 is so significant. On that date, the public will know that works published in 1923 are free for public use without tedious or inconclusive research.

For example, in 2019, we will know that Robert Frost’s famous poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” is in the public domain because copyright over the collection containing the poem, New Hampshire, will lapse. (It’s possible that the poem might have entered the public domain earlier because it was first published in a magazine and that earlier copyright was not renewed on time—see discussion thread here—but we can be confident that its copyright has expired in 2019.) Frost’s estate has used copyright law to strictly control uses of his works. Eric Whitacre, who composed the incredible Virtual Choir works, discovered this the hard way when he wrote a piece in memory of a couple who had died within weeks of each other after being married over fifty years. The piece was commissioned by the couple’s daughter, whose favorite poem was “Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening.” Whitacre wrote a choral work based on the poem, and it was so well-received that other conductors began asking him for the work. He writes:

After a LONG legal battle (many letters, many representatives), the estate of Robert Frost and their publisher, Henry Holt Inc., sternly and formally forbid me from using the poem for publication or performance… I was crushed. The piece was dead, and would sit under my bed for the next 37 years because of some ridiculous ruling by heirs and lawyers.

(Eventually he asked the poet Charles Anthony Silvestri to write new words for the music that had been set to Frost’s poem, you can see the Virtual Choir performance of that composition here and read his full story here; note that Frost’s lawyers were mistaken about when the copyright ends, as indicated above, it lapses in 2019, if it hasn’t already.) Beginning in 2019, the next Whitacre won’t face this frustration, and anyone may use this powerful poem in their own creations.

Note that copyright law has a way of introducing complexities into any analysis. There are some familiar works that appear to be from 1923, but are not in fact entering the public domain in 2019 because of publication details. One is Felix Salten’s Bambi, A Life in the Woods, the basis for Disney’s famous movie. Salten first published it in Germany without a copyright notice in 1923, then republished it with a compliant copyright notice in 1926. When Disney (of all companies) claimed that Bambi was in the public domain, a court disagreed, holding that because the initial 1923 publication was in Germany, the failure to include a copyright notice did not put the book into the US public domain. The 1926 publication was valid, so the book’s copyright expires after 95 years in 2022.3 (The court’s full opinion is here.) Also, while the copyrights in several Jelly Roll Morton songs lapse in 2019, his famous “King Porter Stomp” was not copyrighted until 1924 (even though it was recorded in 1923), so it is not entering the public domain until 2020.

In an abundance of caution, our list above only includes works where we were actually able to track down the notice and renewal data suggesting that they are indeed still in-copyright until 2019. We’ve also compiled—to the best of our research capabilities—a fuller spreadsheet showing other renewed works from 1923. You can find it here. But we want to emphasize that this is only a partial collection; many more works are entering the public domain as well, but we could not find the legal minutia to confirm their copyright status.

It’s a Wonderful Public Domain. . . . What happens when works enter the public domain? Sometimes, wonderful things. The 1947 film It’s A Wonderful Life entered the public domain in 1975 because its copyright was not properly renewed after the first 28-year term. The film had been a flop on release, but thanks to its public domain status, it became a holiday classic. Why? Because TV networks were free to show it over and over again during the holidays, making the film immensely popular. But then copyright law reentered the picture. . . . In 1993, the film’s original copyright holder, capitalizing on a recent Supreme Court case, reasserted copyright based on its ownership of the film’s musical score and the short story on which the film was based (the film itself is still in the public domain). Ironically, a film that only became a success because of its public domain status was pulled back into copyright.

What Could Have Been

Works from 1923 are finally entering the public domain, after a 95-year copyright term. However, under the laws that were in effect until 1978, thousands of works from 1962 would be entering the public domain this year. They range from the books A Wrinkle in Time and The Guns of August, to the film Lawrence of Arabia and the song Blowin’ in the Wind, and much more. Have a look at some of the others. In fact, since copyright used to come in renewable terms of 28 years, and 85% of authors did not renew, 85% of the works from 1990 might be entering the public domain! Imagine what the great libraries of the world—or just internet hobbyists—could do: digitizing those holdings, making them available for education and research, for pleasure and for creative reuse.

Want to learn more about the public domain? Here is the legal background on how we got our current copyright terms (including summaries of recent court cases), why the public domain matters, and answers to Frequently Asked Questions. You can also read James Boyle’s book The Public Domain: Enclosing the Commons of the Mind (Yale University Press, 2008)—naturally, you can read the full text of The Public Domain online at no cost and you are free to copy and redistribute it for non-commercial purposes. You can also read “In Ambiguous Battle: The Promise (and Pathos) of Public Domain Day,” an article by Center Director Jennifer Jenkins revealing the promise and the limits of various attempts to reverse the erosion of the public domain, and a short article in the Huffington Post celebrating a previous Public Domain Day.


1 No published works have entered our public domain since 1998. However, a small subset of works—unpublished works that were not registered with the Copyright Office before 1978—have been entering the public domain after a life plus 70 copyright term. But, because these works were never published, potential users are much less likely to encounter them. In addition, it is difficult to determine whether works were “published” for copyright purposes. Therefore, this site focuses on the thousands of published works that are finally entering the public domain.

2 Works published between 1923 and 1977 had to meet certain requirements to be eligible for the 95-year term—they all had to be published with a copyright notice, and works from 1923–1963 also had to have their copyrights renewed after the initial 28-year term.

3 Foreign works from 1923 are still copyrighted in the US until 2019 if 1) they complied with US notice and renewal formalities, 2) they were published in the US within 30 days of publication abroad, or 3) if neither of these are true, they were still copyrighted in their home country as of 1/1/96. Note that the copyright term for older works is different in other countries: in the EU, works from authors who died in 1948 will go into the public domain in 2019 after a life plus 70 year term, and in Canada, works of authors who died in 1968 will enter the public domain after a life plus 50 year term.


Special thanks to our tireless and talented research maven and website guru Balfour Smith for building this site and compiling the list of works from 1923.

Ebook Evangelist’s note: This article reprinted from Public Domain Day 2019 by Duke Law School’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain. This article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Daily Links and Deals: Let this retro WordArt generator take you back to 1997

daily_links_1Daily Links for Tuesday, November 8, 2016:

Android Auto gets rid of that pesky car requirement (PC World)Now you use your Android phone in your car without the Android hardware.

Listen to iBooks read by your iPhone: How To Video (CNET) Yes, your iPhone can also read your books to you.

How to follow the 2016 election results online (The Verge) And just cross your fingers that the internet doesn’t slow to a crawl or crash.

More pop might be in store for e-readers thanks to colorful graphene balloons (New Atlas) Are you still holding out for some color?

Let this retro WordArt generator take you back to 1997 (The Verge) Raise your hand if you remember this.

Authors on the 2016 Presidential Election (Publishers Weekly) Not surpisingly, authors have some pretty strong opinions on this election, just like the rest of us.

Both major metro and local newspapers drop their paywalls for Election Day coverage (Talking New Media) Nicely done.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Little Lamb Lost by Margaret Fenton.

In Today’s Deals, save up to 50% off select PNY memory devices. Also deals on APC UPS units and surge strips.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Live from the Campaign Trail: The Greatest Presidential Campaign Speeches of the Twentieth Century and How They Shaped Modern America by Michael A. Cohen.  The Romance Daily Find is Fatal Scandal by Marie Force.

Barnes and Noble also has a selection of NOOK Books Under $2.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Forgotten Sins (Sin Brothers Book 1) by Rebecca Zanetti. The Extra Daily Deal is The Bone Tree: A Novel (Penn Cage Book 5) by Greg Iles.

You can buy 2, get 1 free and save on Fern Michaels’ holiday romance titles until November 30.

There is also a selection of Great Reads Under $5 and Bargain Reads in Fiction, in Mystery and other genres. The Kobo Aura One (and the Aura Edition 2 e-readers are now available for order at the Kobo store. (The Aura One is still out of stock.)

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes The Fall by John Lescroart.

Google Books has a selection of Big Deals.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Prime Reading: The good, the bad and the confusing

prime_reading_banner_1000

Recently, Amazon expanded its Prime benefits by adding a new feature called Prime Reading.It allows Prime Members in the US to read for free from a selection of over a thousand books, magazines, comics and more.  I have been using it over the last week and wanted to share some observations.

The available material is only a small subset of the content in the Kindle Unlimited (KU) program (which has over a million titles). Also, like some of the content on Scribd, the content in Prime Reading will rotate a variety of content monthly, whereas the Kindle Unlimited content is available as long as the content is in the program.

Like Kindle Unlimited, you can borrow up to 10 books at one time. You seem to be able to borrow an unlimited amount of books in total. If you already have 10 books on your device, you will be prompted to return one before you can borrow another.

The Good

For a long time, Prime membership included the benefit of reading free books with the Kindle Owners Lending Library (KOLL).  Because this was set up for owners of an actual Kindle device, the KOLL monthly borrow couldn’t be initiated on the Kindle apps or the Kindle for PC and cloud reader. Prime Reading will allow borrowing from the apps as longs as the book is compatible.(See below**)

Surprisingly, Amazon has made the Prime Reading section really easy to find. (For a long time, customers have been frustrated that there is no section for KOLL books per se.) For Prime Reading, there are headings in the Kindle Books section on the website and it is even easy to find in the bookstore menu on the Fire tablets:

 

fire_menu

(Click to enlarge)

Like Kindle Unlimited books, books borrowed through Prime Reading show up on your Manage Your Content and Devices (MYCD) page. You can also sort them by date and returned book status.

mycd_prime

The Bad:

One of the new feature of Prime Reading is the addition of magazines to the program. The selection is limited and is in a fixed view format (Amazon’s version of PDF).  That means the text is does not reflow and you have to pinch and zoom to read. Personally, I find this totally useless and way too hard to read. However, if you want to look at the original magazine ads, this has you covered.

Amazon has also added these magazines to the Kindle Unlimited subscription as well,so if you already have Kindle Unlimited, Prime Reading is unlikely to offer any additional value.

Every time Amazon shows you the Prime Reading section, it uses the opportunity to pitch you Kindle Unlimited. Since Prime Reading books are a small subset of the KU books, if you are already a Kindle Unlimited subscriber, there probably isn’t any added value for you from just Prime Reading feature .

Prime Reading content cannot be shared and content cannot be loaned to other Household members on your Prime account. Only the primary user can access any of the content, although it can be delivered to other devices on the same account.

The Confusing:

The content you see available on your screen may vary from one account to the next on both the web and device screens. Prime members who are not Kindle Unlimited members will see something different that those who do not have Prime or who subscribe to Kindle Unlimited.

Here’s the one of my favorite recent reads, Anne Frazier’s The Body Reader, as seen on two different Kindle Paperwhites. The one on the left is my husband’s; he is the Prime account holder and does not subscribe to Kindle Unlimited. The one on the right is from my Paperwhite; I do not have a Prime account of my own but do subscribe to Kindle Unlimited. Note the difference in the text on the button on the left.

prime_comp

(Click to enlarge)

As with borrowing through the KOLL library, you will be charged the purchase price of the book if you click on the buy button instead of the one that says read for free.

If you are neither a Prime or KU subscriber, you should see a Kindle Unlimited prompt next to the buy button as a default.

On the Fire Tablet, Prime Reading displays pretty much the same way. Note the pitch to join Kindle Unlimited at the bottom:

prime_fire

(Click to enlarge)

**Also  somewhat confusing is the fact that, due to formatting issues, all material from Prime Reading may not be available on all devices. Some people have reported that they cannot read some titles on various apps or devices. I myself have had problems certain graphic-heavy books not downloading, although they still show as borrowed on the MYCD page. On the first day, there were some reports of some comics and graphic novels coming up sideways. 😦

Books that can’t be delivered to a particular device do not seem to be indicated on the borrow page itself. Ineligible devices for delivery of a particular book are grayed out on the MYCD page.

It is still not clear exactly how the rotation in the Prime Reading program works. Will the titles change monthly? What happens if a title is removed from the selection before you are finished reading? It will be interesting to see how the program develops.

Have you tried Prime Reading? What do you think?

Daily Links and Deals: The banning of books in prisons

daily_links_1Today, an article on books that are banned in prison. Also, Blackberry decides to outsource its devices, PRH launches a new SciFi/Fantasy site and more. In deals, a FoodSaver vacuum sealing system.

Daily Links for Wednesday, September 28,  2016:

The banning of books in prisons: ‘It’s like living in the dark ages’ (The Guardian) Disturbing piece about how prison choose which books to ban.

Mobile phones deliver infection risk in the workplace according to new study (ZD Net) There’s fodder for a zombie apocalypse novel in here somewhere….

PSA: Windows 10’s Anniversary Update reactivates ads you’ve already disabled (PC World) The Anniversary Update just rolled out to my computer and it is just as obnoxious as this article indicates.

BlackBerry says it’s done designing and building its own phones (The Verge) No, it’s not the end of the devices. The company is going to outsource the job instead.

Penguin Random House Launches SciFi/Fantasy Site ‘Unbound Worlds’ (Digital Book World) Until PRH raised the prices of their ebooks sky high, I was a fan of Suvudu. This site is its successor.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Lovecraft’s Monsters by Neil Gaiman, Ellen Datlow.

In Today’s Deals,  a FoodSaver FM2435-ECR Vacuum Sealing System with Bonus Handheld Sealer and Starter Kit, Silver.

The Echo iavailable today  in white. There is also an  All-New Echo Dot (2nd Generation) which will be available in both black and white and retails for $49.99. The Dot is also being offering in a “Buy 5, get 1 free” six-pack and a ““Buy 10, get 2 free” twelve-pack”. The new Echo Dot will be released on October 20, 2016.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Autumn Imago by Bryan Wiggins. The Romance Daily Find is Caged Warrior (Dragon Kings Series #1) by Lindsey Piper.

Barnes and Noble also has a selection of NOOK Books Under $2.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Instant Attraction (Wilder Brothers) by Jill Shalvis. The Extra Daily Deal is Kiss Me in the Rain (The Tanner Family Book 1) by Sarah Kades.

Also, select romance titles at the Kobo store for 99 cents until October 2nd.

There is also a selection of Great Reads Under $5 and Bargain Reads in Fiction, in Mystery and other genres. The Kobo Aura One (and the Aura Edition 2 e-readers are now available for order at the Kobo store. (The Aura One is out of stock until September 23, 2016 – now delayed to September 30, 2016 October 7, 2016.)

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Make ‘Em Laugh by Debbie Reynolds & Dorian Hannaway.

Google Books has a selection of Topsellers Under $10.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: Old book, new look: why the classics are flying off the shelves

daily_links_1Today, repackaging classic literature is making money for publishers. Also, the new Audible Channels in a problem for Fire Tablet owners, a look at Creative Commons licenses, a 1909 cookbook for sandwiches and more. In deals, savings on TP networking products.

Daily Links for Monday, September 19. 2016:

Amazon’s new ‘Audible Channels’ Prime benefit is great — but it’s not available on Amazon tablets (Update: They’re working on it) (Geek Wire) This is frustrating and is a problem for people who share Prime benefits.

Old book, new look: why the classics are flying off the shelves (The Guardian) Repackaging old, public domain books makes money for publishers.

Creative Commons licenses under scrutiny—what does “noncommercial” mean? (Ars Technica) Commercial v. noncommercial use of CC licenses. Where’s the line of demarcation?

Has the EU just outlawed fully-loaded Kodi boxes? What’s in store for the box that is very, very popular with pirates?

400 Ways to Make a Sandwich: A 1909 Cookbook Full of Creative Recipes (Open Culture) A free cookbook from 1909 has some interesting sandwich variations.

Who needs cable? Broadcast TV makes a comeback (Talking New Media) Don’t write off over-the-air signals just yet. Live TV is still at play – at least for the time being.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson.

In Today’s Deals, save up to 40% on select TP-Link networking products.

The all-new version of the Fire 8 HD tablet is available for pre-order. The tablet is $89.99 and will be released on September 21, 2016.

Amazon has now released the Echo a second color. You can pre-order the Echo now to get it in white. It will be available on September 28, 2016. There is also an  All-New Echo Dot (2nd Generation) which will be available in both black and white and retails for $49.99. The Dot is also being offering in a “Buy 5, get 1 free” six-pack and a ““Buy 10, get 2 free” twelve-pack”. The new Echo Dot will be released on October 20, 2016.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Is This Tomorrow: A Novel by Caroline Leavitt. The Romance Daily Find is Undone by Shannon Richard.

Barnes and Noble also has a selection of NOOK Books Under $2.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Gideon’s Sword by Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child. The Extra Daily Deal is Five Quarters of the Orange A Novel by Joanne Harris.

There is also a selection of Great Reads Under $5 and Bargain Reads in Fiction, in Mystery and other genres. The Kobo Aura One (and the Aura Edition 2 e-readers are now available for order at the Kobo store. (The Aura One is out of stock until September 23, 2016.)

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes AT Dawn by John W. Mefford.

Google Books has a selection of Big Books, Big Deals, up to 75% off great reads.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: London prisoners to get free ‘Books in Nicks’

daily_links_1Today, a story about a new initiative to bring books to prisoners in London jails. Also, Amazon launches the Kindle Reading Fund, citizens are asked to open their WiFi to help with the earthquake rescue in Italy and more. Today’s deals include a Lenovo laptop and deals on Daredevil comics.

Daily Links for day, August 25, 2016:

Amazon launches the Kindle Reading Fund to expand digital reading around the world (Techcrunch) Amazon’s initiative allows schools and 501(c)(3) organizations to make donation requests.

Italian earthquake victims asked to disable WiFi passwords (Engadget) To facilitate rescue efforts, people are being asked to open up their WiFi networks for allow aid workers and people needing help to use online services to communicate.

A book purge has reawakened a love of books (The Lima News) A book purge using the “spark joy” method from Marie Kondo’s The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up had a surprising result.

Smashwords Alerts Notifies Readers of New Releases from Favorite Authors (Smashwords) This new feature makes it easier to keep track of new works by your faves.

London prisoners to get free ‘Books in Nicks’ (The Bookseller) Last year, there as a plan floated to deny prisoners books. Now they plan to give them away instead.

Deals of the Day: 

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes several Daredevil Comics collections.

In Today’s Deals, a Lenovo Thinkpad T460 14″ Laptop, a Dyson V6 Cordless Vacuum (Certified Refurbished), and a Hamilton Beach Set ‘n Forget Programmable Slow Cooker.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee. The Romance Daily Find is Hard to Hold (Hold Trilogy Series #1) by Stephanie Tyler.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Dream Man by Linda Howard. The Extra Daily Deal is Game Theory: A Katerina Carter Fraud Legal Thriller by Colleen Cross.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Looking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen by Susan Gregg Gilmore. Isn’t this a great title? 🙂

Google Books has a selection of Hot Book Deals.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: The Secret Libraries of History

daily_links_1Today, an article on secret libraries through the centuries. Also, a look at things book lovers do that others may consider weird,  a crowdfunding project that brings e-readers to kids who can’t touch real books and a primer on SD cards. In deals, a Swingline laminator and savings on Alexa enable products. And finally, the price is reduced on The Girl On TheTrain.

Daily Links for Monday, August 22, 2016:

The Secret Libraries of History (BBC) Fascinating article on libraries and collections that have been hidden for centuries.

7 Weird Things I Do With Books (Read It Forward) I actually met my husband in a bookstore, so none of this seems weird to me at all….

Best SD cards (Tab Times) If SD cards are confusing to you, here’s an article that may help. It explains the basics and explains available options.

This NYC Hospital Teacher Is Crowdfunding E-Readers for Sick Students Who Can’t Risk Handling Books (The 74) This is heartwarming and highlights a circumstance where digital is better than print.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes I”d Tell You I Love You, But Then I”d Have to Kill You (Gallagher Girls Book 1) by Ally Carter.

In Today’s Deals, a Swingline Laminator. You can also still get $15 off the regular price of the Amazon Tap and the Certified Refurbished Amazon Echo for $150.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is The Firm by John Grisham. The Romance Daily Find is Stirring Attraction: A Second Shot Novel by Sara Jane Stone.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Over You (A Romance Novel) by H.M. Ward, L.G. Castillo. The Extra Daily Deal is Pardonable Lies
A Maisie Dobbs Novel by Jacqueline Winspear.

Also, until August 29, 2016, there’s a Back to School Sale: books $4.99 or less. There is also a  selection of Great Reads Under $5 and Bargain Reads in Fiction, in Mystery and other genres.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes No Limits by Michael Phelps.

Google Books has a selection of Hot Book Deals.

Price Reduction: For those of you that boycott books priced over $9.99, Paula Hawkins’ The Girl On The Train has been reduced from $11.99 to $9.99. And FYI, that’s more expensive than the paperback, which is $9.60 on Amazon.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.