Did your Fire Tablet just deregister itself?

fire HDXI am reading multiple reports on the Amazon forums that some people are having problems with their Fire tablets somehow spontaneously deregistering from their accounts. Members are reporting that all their books, personal photos, documents and emails are being wiped off the devices.

Many of the reports seem to involve the Fire HD 8.9, but I did see one reporting the problem on an Fire HD 8 and another reporting the issue on a Fire HD 6.

It’s not clear if this is an update gone wrong or a bug. It does seem to be specific to the Fire tablets and not the e-ink Kindles. The tablets seem to doing a factory reset while in sleep mode. One forum member said that they called customer service and were told that Amazon is working on the problem.

I don’t keep very many personal items on my Fire tablets, but I do have a couple of apps that I have to install manually as they are not in the app store. I did notice that the Scribd app was missing from my Fire HD 6, as well as a couple of others. So, I will be calling customer service later today to see what’s up.

Have you had a problem with your Fire tablet?

Update: I posted an update to this issue here.

Update 2: Amazon has posted an announcement on the issue. Post here.

Related: Did your Fire tablet just de-register … again? June 17, 2016

 

 

What’s Your Fire Tablet Worth? Amazon is taking trade-ins

fire_tradeinAs I mentioned in today’s Daily Links and Deals post, starting today, Amazon’s is selling $50 Fire Tablet in colors. Both the  8GB and 16GB versions are available in blue, magenta and tangerine, as well as basic black. If you are looking to buy one of the new colors or a larger version and have an old Fire you want to get rid of, you may be interested in Amazon’s trade-in program for the Fire.

For a limited time, you can trade-in your Fire for an Amazon Gift Card and a coupon for a 20% bonus savings good towards the purchase of a new Fire Tablet. Simply identify your Fire, complete the paperwork and send it in. Once Amazon verifies the condition, you will get the gift card and bonus coupon.

Amazon is accepting trade-ins on both working and non’working Fires. Models acceptable for trade-in are:

  • *Kindle Fire, 1st and 2nd generations.
  • *Kindle Fire HD 7″ 2nd and 3rd generations
  • *Kindle Fire HD 8.9″ Wi-Fi and 8.9″ Wi-Fi + 4G LTE
  • *Kindle Fire HDX 7″ Wi-Fi and Kindle Fire HDX 7″ Wi-Fi + 4G LTE
  • *Kindle Fire HDX 8.9″ Wi-Fi and Kindle Fire HDX 8.9″ Wi-Fi + 4G LTE
  • Fire HD 6 Wi-Fi
  • Fire HD 7 Wi-Fi
  • Fire HDX 8.9 Wi-Fi
  • Fire HDX 8.9 Wi-Fi + 4G LTE

*Note the name change: The earliest versions were referred to as Kindle Fires; later versions dropped the Kindle from the name.

There is a page where you can see pictures to help determine you model. I also wrote a post a while back on identifying your Kindle model which may help. Amazon Kindle customer service can help if all else fails.

You can apply your coupon to the following Fire tablets:

Several caveats on this deal. The time frame on the offer is extremely limited. Trade-ins must be completed by May 9, 2016, so if you are interested, you need to act quickly. Other limits, terms and conditions apply.

Also, be aware that the trade-in values are much, much  lower than you probably could get on eBay or another venue: Amazon’s offer for a 1st generation Kindle Fire is $5 in either working or non-working condition.  The value for a working Fire HD 6 is listed at only $11. The real value here is probably the 20% off bonus.

While Amazon has offered trade-in programs for the Kindle before, this is the first time I have seen one exclusively for the Fire.

Are you interested?

Note that Amazon has updated its Trade-in Program to include more devices.  You can find more details in this post about trade-ins.

Daily Links and Deals: He Used the Internet—I Used the Encyclopedia

daily_links_1Today, stories include, a then and now look at the differences in the technology we use in college, a new way of paying bills online, a how to on removing malware and much more. In deals, A/V receivers, new Fire tablets in colors and accessories at 50% off.

Daily Links for Thursday, April 21, 2016:

Senate Library (University of London) Provides Interactive Shakespeare Timeline Online (Infodocket) This is great for fans of the Bard!

He Used the Internet—I Used the Encyclopedia (Huffington Post) An interesting look at the tools used in college, then and now….

Plastiq lets you pay any bill with your credit or debit card just by snapping a photo (Techcrunch) This sounds really easy and could change the way we pay bills.

ICYMI: These 7 words and phrases from the Web are heading into the dictionary (The Next Web) Acronyms from the online world continues to become more and more mainstream.

Mexico City is crowdsourcing its new constitution using Change.org in a democracy experiment (Quartz) This is a fascinating first. It will be interesting to see the results of this.

Your PC has malware! Here’s how to remove it (PCWorld) Do you know what to do if you get a virus or malware? There’s some helpful links here for diagnosing infections as well.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Named of the Dragon by Susanna Kearsley for $1.99 ans well as books by John Hart.

In Today’s Deals, there’s an Origami R5-01W General Purpose 4-Shelf Steel Collapsible Storage Rack with Wheels and a deal for savings of up to 50% off select Onkyo 7.2-Channel Network A/V Receivers. 

Amazon id now offering the 8 GB $50 Fire in colors! Besides black, you can get blue, magenta and tangerine. The 16 GB version is only $20.00 more. And don’t  forget to protect your investment with a case! There are lots of cases, covers and accessories to choose from for 50% off.

Amazon is still offering savings on the Fire HD 6, and deals on pre-owned Fire tablets. I am also still seeing the option for 5 payments of $58 for the Kindle Oasis pre-order.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is One Thing Stolen by Beth Kephart for 2.99. The Romance Daily Find is Small Town Sinners by Melissa Walker for $1.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is The Last Child by John Hart for $2.99.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Cubicles by Camika Spencer for 99 cents.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals – The Internet Really Has Changed Everything: Here’s the Proof

daily_links_1Today, a case study in how the internet has changed our lives, an opinion piece on whether the e-reader is about to make a comeback and news about how a deal with DC Comics means more digital availability. In deals, you can find watches, anime DVDs and a deal on an Anker portable charger.

Daily Links for Wednesday, April 20, 2016:

5 Gmail hacks that help you master your messages (PC World) Tips to help you get a lot more out of your inbox.

9 settings every new iPhone owner should change (CNET) These tweaks will improve the performance and battery life of your phone.

The Internet Really Has Changed Everything: Here’s the Proof (Backchannel) This is a long, fascinating introspective read. A journalist reflects on how technology has changed things his tiny, rural hometown.

Is the e-book reader about to stage a comeback? (The Bookseller) Interesting opinion piece on whether e-readers are really in their death throes.

DC COMICS Reaches New Deal For eBook Distribution Worldwide (Newsarama) There are a lot of comics coming! Overdrive also announces the comics are now available for libraries to purchase.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes The Fire Sermon by Francesca Haig for $1.99.

In Today’s Deals,   we have men’s and women’s Stuhrling Original watches.  Anime lovers, you can also get up to 61% off “Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” and “Steins Gate: The Complete Series” DVD sets and an Anker PowerCore 13000 Portable Charger.

Amazon is still offering savings on the Fire HD 6, and deals on pre-owned Fire tablets. I am also still seeing the option for 5 payments of $58 for the Kindle Oasis pre-order.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Fiesta of Smoke by Suzan Still for $2.99. The Romance Daily Find is The Bradens (Books 1-3 Boxed Sets) by Melissa Foster for $2.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Jewels of the Sun (Gallaghers of Ardmore Trilogy, Book #1) by Nora Roberts for $1.99.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Exiles in the Garden by Ward Just for $2.99.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: Evolving Technologies Change the Nature of Internet Use

daily_links_1Today, stories on how new technology affects how we use the internet, changes in Journalism, and a new smart toy for your pets lets you play with your cat or dog from anywhere. In deals, an offer from Verizon and sale pricing on the Amazon Echo and the Amazon Tap Alexa-enabled devices.

Daily Links for Tuesday, April 19, 2016:

Track all your partner’s infidelities with this smart mattress (Engadget) Is it just me or is this taking “connectedness” too far?

Key Ring Chronicles: Library Card (McSweeney’s) Um, that doesn’t happen with ebooks….

Verizon Wireless Android Users Can Get 2GB Free for Using Android Pay! (Gear Diary) This is a limited time offer good through mid-June.

Journalism isn’t dying. But it’s changing WAY faster than most people understand (Washington Post) Until we understand those changes, a clear direction for journalism is not going to present itself.

Play with your pets from anywhere with PlayDate’s smart ball (Engadget) This sounds like it would be a great for pet owners, although it is a little pricey.

The New York Public Library Digitizes Centuries-Old Hebrew Manuscripts (NYPL) Fascinating collection of late medieval and early modern manuscripts, including a couple on Kaballah.

Evolving Technologies Change the Nature of Internet Use (NTIA) A report from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration looks at how we interact online with new tech.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes The Mandel Files, Volume 1: Mindstar Rising & A Quantum Murder (Greg Mandel) by Peter F. Hamilton for $1.99.

In Today’s Deals, Amazon is offering 15% off the Amazon Echo and the Amazon Tap.  Also a deal on the Sons of Anarchy: The Complete series on either Blu-ray or DVD.

Amazon is still offering savings on the Fire HD 6, and deals on pre-owned Fire tablets. I am also still seeing the option for 5 payments of $58 for the Kindle Oasis pre-order.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Bone Dust White by Karin Salvalaggio for $2.99. The Romance Daily Find is Chasing Jillian (Love and Football Series #5) for 99 cents.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is Spring Fever by Mary Kay Andrews for $2.99.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes The Invention of Everything Else by Samantha Hunt for $2.99.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: Fair use prevails as Supreme Court rejects Google Books copyright case

daily_links_1Today, The Supreme Court declined to hear the Google Books case, Tidal is getting sued, we are getting 360 video and Amazon is starting to unbundle its Prime subscription. In deals, we have Belkin surge protectors, Cuisinart grills and Fire Tablet  and Kindle deals.

Daily Links for Monday, April 18, 2016:

Android VS iOS: How They Compare (Tab Times) Nice comparison of the two systems.

Jay Z, Tidal & Kanye West sued for misstatements about ‘The Life of Pablo’ exclusivity (Techcrunch) In an age where every service is offering something different and exclusive, we may be seeing more of this kind of story in the tech world.

Amazon has built a subscription launchpad with Amazon Prime (Techcrunch)  Amazon Prime can now be bought by the month and so can Amazon Prime Video.  This article talks about what Amazon may really be trying to accomplish with the move.

Fair use prevails as Supreme Court rejects Google Books copyright case (Ars Technica) Agree or disagree – at least it is over!

YouTube introduces live 360 video, the gateway drug to virtual reality (The Verge) Here we go. The beginning of experiencing the world without leaving your house.

Google Play Music officially has podcasts for the Web and Android (The Next Web) Be aware that you probably won’t see all of your favorite podcast. It’s not on iOS yet. Google’s terms say they do not sharing revenue with podcasters, so a lot of people passed on enrolling.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes The Clockwork Scarab and The Spiritglass Charade, the first two books in the Stoker & Holmes YA series by Colleen Gleason for $1.99 each. There is plenty of vampire hunting and mystery solving for the protagonists who happen to be the sister of Bram Stoker and the neice of Sherlock Holmes.

In Today’s Deals, get up to 60% off select Belkin surge protectors, up to 60% off select Cuisinart Grilling products and a  SINGER 3232 Simple Sewing Machine with Automatic Needle Threader.

Amazon is still offering savings on the Fire HD 6, deals on pre-owned Fire tablets and savings of $15 on a Fire Essentials Bundle. I am also still seeing the option for 5 payments of $58 for the Kindle Oasis pre-order.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is The Weird World of Words: A Guided Tour by Mitchell Symons for $2.99. The Romance Daily Find is The Rogue’s Proposal (House of Trent Series #2) by Jennifer Haymore for $2.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal is The Killing Game by Toni Anderson for $99 cents.

LAST DAY! Select Romantic Times winners & nominees are on sale for under $3 at the Kobo store until April 18, 2016.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes The Throwback Special by Chris Bachelder for $2.99.

Google has a limited time promotion that includes some interesting cookbooks, including BabyCakes: Vegan, (Mostly) Gluten-Free, and (Mostly) Sugar-Free Recipes from New York’s Most Talked-About Bakery by  Erin McKenna for $1.99. (Also at Amazon, Barnes and Noble)

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Why the Internet isn’t making us smarter – and how to fight back

interent_educateBy David Dunning, University of Michigan

In the hours since I first sat down to write this piece, my laptop tells me the National Basketball Association has had to deny that it threatened to cancel its 2017 All-Star Game over a new anti-LGBT law in North Carolina – a story repeated by many news sources including the Associated Press. The authenticity of that viral video of a bear chasing a female snowboarder in Japan has been called into question. And, no, Ted Cruz is not married to his third cousin. It’s just one among an onslaught of half-truths and even pants-on-fire lies coming as we rev up for the 2016 American election season.

The longer I study human psychology, the more impressed I am with the rich tapestry of knowledge each of us owns. We each have a brainy weave of facts, figures, rules and stories that allows us to address an astonishing range of everyday challenges. Contemporary research celebrates just how vast, organized, interconnected and durable that knowledge base is.

That’s the good news. The bad news is that our brains overdo it. Not only do they store helpful and essential information, they are also receptive to false belief and misinformation.

Just in biology alone, many people believe that spinach is a good source of iron (sorry, Popeye), that we use less than 10 percent of our brains (no, it’s too energy-guzzling to allow that), and that some people suffer hypersensitivity to electromagnetic radiation (for which there is no scientific evidence).

But here’s the more concerning news. Our access to information, both good and bad, has only increased as our fingertips have gotten into the act. With computer keyboards and smartphones, we now have access to an Internet containing a vast store of information much bigger than any individual brain can carry – and that’s not always a good thing.

Better access doesn’t mean better information

This access to the Internet’s far reaches should permit us to be smarter and better informed. People certainly assume it. A recent Yale study showed that Internet access causes people to hold inflated, illusory impressions of just how smart and well-informed they are.

But there’s a twofold problem with the Internet that compromises its limitless promise.

First, just like our brains, it is receptive to misinformation. In fact, the World Economic Forum lists “massive digital misinformation” as a main threat to society. A survey of 50 “weight loss” websites found that only three provided sound diet advice. Another of roughly 150 YouTube videos about vaccination found that only half explicitly supported the procedure.

Rumor-mongers, politicians, vested interests, a sensationalizing media and people with intellectual axes to grind all inject false information into the Internet.

So do a lot of well-intentioned but misinformed people. In fact, a study published in the January 2016 Proceedings of National Academy of Science documented just how quickly dubious conspiracy theories spread across the Internet. Specifically, the researchers compared how quickly these rumors spread across Facebook relative to stories on scientific discoveries. Both conspiracy theories and scientific news spread quickly, with the majority of diffusion via Facebook for both types of stories happening within a day.

Making matters worse, misinformation is hard to distinguish from accurate fact. It often has the exact look and feel as the truth. In a series of studies Elanor Williams, Justin Kruger and I published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 2013, we asked students to solve problems in intuitive physics, logic and finance. Those who consistently relied on false facts or principles – and thus gave the exact same wrong answer to every problem – expressed just as much confidence in their conclusions as those who answered every single problem right.

For example, those who always thought a ball would continue to follow a curved path after rolling out of a bent tube (not true) were virtually as certain as people who knew the right answer (the ball follows a straight path).

Defend yourself

So, how so we separate Internet truth from the false?

First, don’t assume misinformation is obviously distinguishable from true information. Be careful. If the matter is important, perhaps you can start your search with the Internet; just don’t end there. Consult and consider other sources of authority. There is a reason why your doctor suffered medical school, why your financial advisor studied to gain that license.

Second, don’t do what conspiracy theorists did in the Facebook study. They readily spread stories that already fit their worldview. As such, they practiced confirmation bias, giving credence to evidence supporting what they already believed. As a consequence, the conspiracy theories they endorsed burrowed themselves into like-minded Facebook communities who rarely questioned their authenticity.

Instead, be a skeptic. Psychological research shows that groups designating one or two of its members to play devil’s advocates – questioning whatever conclusion the group is leaning toward – make for better-reasoned decisions of greater quality.

If no one else is around, it pays to be your own devil’s advocate. Don’t just believe what the Internet has to say; question it. Practice a disconfirmation bias. If you’re looking up medical information about a health problem, don’t stop at the first diagnosis that looks right. Search for alternative possibilities.

Seeking evidence to the contrary

In addition, look for ways in which that diagnosis might be wrong. Research shows that “considering the opposite” – actively asking how a conclusion might be wrong – is a valuable exercise for reducing unwarranted faith in a conclusion.

After all, you should listen to Mark Twain, who, according to a dozen different websites, warned us, “Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.”

Wise words, except a little more investigation reveals more detailed and researched sources with evidence that it wasn’t Mark Twain, but German physician Markus Herz who said them. I’m not surprised; in my Internet experience, I’ve learned to be wary of Twain quotes (Will Rogers, too). He was a brilliant wit, but he gets much too much credit for quotable quips.

Misinformation and true information often look awfully alike. The key to an informed life may not require gathering information as much as it does challenging the ideas you already have or have recently encountered. This may be an unpleasant task, and an unending one, but it is the best way to ensure that your brainy intellectual tapestry sports only true colors.

The Conversationby David Dunning, Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Posted under a  CC license.