On being disconnected in a connected world…

Last week, our router died. So, POOF, no internet other than mobile phone access for a couple of days until our ISP got a new router out to us.

It was a bit of a culture shock for sure. Since my husband and I work from home, we really rely on the internet for most things that we do. Both of us are used to using a desktop rather than a mobile device to go about our internet business, so trying to function predominantly on a phone was a challenge. And, although we both have smartphones, we have a plan with only a limited amount of data (because we work from home and normally, we are always on Wi-Fi). That meant rationing data (UGH). That meant no Alexa or Google Home (MORE UGH). And that whole cord-cutting thing? It really works a lot better with the internet, even with an over-the-air antenna in the house.

Somehow, mostly by using our phones as mobile hotspots for my Chromebook, we muddled through until the replacement router arrived.

It turns out that my idea of a good router and my ISP’s idea of a good router are definitely not the same thing.The one that the service provider sent is definitely not doing the job – while I can get on the internet and get the ROKUs and the Google Home working, the network extender, our Amazon Echo devices and most of my Kindles don’t want to connect properly. (That makes it over a week with no Alexa, in case you are keeping score, LOL!)

So, I have now purchased yet another router (this one to MY specifications) and the one I purchased from our ISP will be relegated to being a back up. I’m spending the next few days trying to get all our toys back up and running. I’ll be back to blogging as soon as I get everything plugged back in…. ūüôā

Anybody have any disconnected stories to share?

Daily Links and Deals: Bookish fools

daily_links_1Daily Links for Friday, October 21,  2016:

Microsoft rescues disheveled lady Skypers with its TeleBeauty virtual makeup app (PC World) Okay, webcams are not always so flattering. That makes the idea of this one really hard to resist.

Hands on: Netflix via Comcast’s Xfinity X1 set-top box is a very good experience (PC World) Not sure this would really beat my Roku stick, but for a set-top cable box, it sounds impressive.

Bookish fools (Aeon) Is the preference for print over digital a mark of snobbery? A look at whate what history says….

6 ways to delete yourself from the internet (CNET) There’s a lot of information about you on the web. Here’s how to start to get rid of it – or most of it anyway.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Girls & Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape by Peggy Orenstein.

In Today’s Deals, the new Lady Gaga album¬†(for $3.99), select patio heaters, Fila jackets and¬†Sons of Anarchy The Complete Series [Blu-ray and DVD].

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is a collection of over 70 titles in the “Idiot’s Guide” series. The Romance Daily Find is¬†Yesterday’s Roses¬†by Heather Cullman.

Barnes and Noble also has a selection of NOOK Books Under $2.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is The Escape¬†by David Baldacci. ¬† The Extra Daily Deal is¬†Much Ado About Highlanders (The Scottish Relic Trilogy Book 1)¬†by May McGoldrick.

Also, a selection of titles called Romance On The Ice for $4.99 or Less until October Until October 31st.

There is also a selection of Great Reads Under $5 and Bargain Reads in Fiction, in Mystery and other genres. The Kobo Aura One (and the Aura Edition 2 e-readers are now available for order at the Kobo store. (The Aura One is out of stock until October 19, 2016.)

Google Books has a selection of Halloween Horror Sale: Chills & thrills under $5.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: Amazon’s Launching Pickup Locations, but Where Are Its Consumer Bookstores?

daily_links_1Not so long ago, we heard that Amazon was going to be opening all these new bookstores. While we are hearing about the pickup locations, where are all the new stores for consumers? Also, a look at the restrictions in Sprint and T-Mobile’s new unlimited plans, how Netflix is forcing users to search for content on its own apps, a changing of the guard (sort of) for the internet’s nameservers and a fun site that lets you search for photos by drawing bad pictures. In deals, a Vizio soundbar and continued deals on Kindles, Fires and Alexa enabled devices.

Daily Links for Friday, August 19, 2016:

Netflix moved cord cutting forward; it’s also holding it back (TechHive) Is Netflix shooting itself in the foot by keeping its content out of cross-platform streaming searches?

In 44 days the US will no longer oversee the internet’s naming system (Quartz) The US will no longer have control over this key piece of internet infrastucture.

T-Mobile and Sprint’s new unlimited plans have some nasty fine print (The Verge) Don’t jump for joy just yet… there are restrictions with those new plans. If you watch video or tether your phone, these may impact you.

This site lets you search for photos by drawing bad pictures ‚Äď and it‚Äôs really fun (The Next Web) Yes, this is kind of fun!

Amazon’s Launching Pickup Locations, but Where Are Its Consumer Bookstores? (Publishers Weekly) Why aren’t we seeing all those new bookstores from Amazon yet?

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes The New Neighbor: A Novel by Leah Stewart.

In Today’s Deals, a¬†VIZIO SB2920-C6 29-Inch 2.0 Channel Sound Bar (Certified Refurbished).

Continuing for a limited time, get $15 off the regular price of the Amazon Tap and theCertified Refurbished Amazon Echo for $150. You can also get $20 off the basic Kindle and the Kindle Paperwhite.  You can also find savings on the Fire HDX 8.9 Tablet (Wi-Fi and 4G LTE) and the Fire Kids Edition Tablet.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra by Vaseem Khan. The Romance Daily Find is The Prophet by Amanda Stevens.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is One with You¬†A Crossfire Novel¬†by Sylvia Day. The Extra Daily Deal is¬†The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra¬†by Vaseem Khan.

Also at the Kobo store, get 50% off select titles with a coupon code.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Supergods by Grant Morrison.

Google Books has a selection of Hot Book Deals.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: Too Poor to Afford the Internet

daily_links_1Today, a look at how the digital divide affects children. Also, a evaluation of the NYPL SimplyE app in the real world, a library computer policy that gives pause and the frustration caused by the lack of a touchscreen Mac model. In deals, back-to-school bargains on Kindles and Fire Tablets.

Daily Links for Monday, August 15, 2016:

Too Poor to Afford the Internet (New York Times) Online homework is part of the norm for schools. What do you do if you don’t have access to the internet?

A Breakthrough for Library E-Books? (Publishers Weekly) A look at the New York Public Library’s¬†SimplyE app after a month of use.

Montana: ‚ÄúThe Parent in Always in Charge‚Äô Under New Billings Library Computer Policy‚ÄĚ (Infodocket) So, a parent has to write a letter before their children¬†can have access to unfiltered computers at the library?

When will we see a touch-enabled Mac? (Recode) If you switch back and forth between a Mac and a PC, the lack of a Mac touchscreen model really stands out.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Life From Scratch: A Memoir of Food, Family, and Forgiveness by Sasha Martin.

In Today’s Deals, fBack to school savings on select Kindles, Fire tablets and Alexa devices. For a limited time,¬†get $15 off the regular price of the Amazon Tap¬†and$20 off the basic Kindle and the Kindle¬†Paperwhite. ¬†You can also find savings on the¬†Fire HDX 8.9 Tablet¬†(Wi-Fi and 4G LTE) and the¬†Fire Kids Edition Tablet.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is A Dark and Twisted Tide by Sharon Bolton, S. J. Bolton. The Romance Daily Find is The Kiss of Deception (The Remnant Chronicles Series #1) by Mary E. Pearson.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is You Will Know Me¬†A Novel¬†by Megan Abbott. The Extra Daily Deal is¬†The Kiss of Deception (The Remnant Chronicles Book 1)¬†by Mary E. Pearson.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Look Closer by Rachel Amphlett.

Google Books has a selection of The Winningest Deals ebooks at up to 75% off.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: More than half the world is still offline

daily_links_1Today, a¬†look at the world’s internet use¬†and the truth about how many still don’t have access, especially among the poor. Also, Chromecast is having its third birthday, an article on the good you can do with used books and a library opponent takes a second look. In deals, a Hoover bagless vacuum that’s designed for pet owners.

Daily Links for Monday, July 25, 2016:

More than half the world is still offline (Computer World) Pretty staggering statistics.

Happy 3rd Birthday, Google Chromecast! (OMG Chrome) That little dongle is having a birthday! Has it really been that long?

Brown: An eye-opening visit to a library (Roanoke Times) A man wrote an article about why we don’t need libraries any more. The push back inspired a visit to see for himself…

Finding a World of Good in Used Books (Publishers Weekly) This is something we can’t do with ebooks, unfortunately.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Poisoned Love by Caitlin Rother.

In Today’s Deals, a¬†Hoover WindTunnel 3 Pro Pet Bagless Upright Vacuum, UH70931PC – Corded.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey. The Romance Daily Find is Operation One Night Stand by Christine Hughes.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is ARKANE Thriller Box-Set: Stone of Fire, Crypt of Bone, Ark of Blood by J.F.Penn. The Extra Daily Deal is¬†Taking the Lead:¬†Secrets of a Rock Star (Book 1)¬†by Cecilia Tan.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes SF novel Astral Fall by Jessica Mae Stover.

Google Books has a Topsellers Under $10 promotion.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: He Used the Internet‚ÄĒI Used the Encyclopedia

daily_links_1Today, stories include, a then and now look at the differences in the technology we use in college, a new way of paying bills online, a how to on removing malware and much more. In deals, A/V receivers, new Fire tablets in colors and accessories at 50% off.

Daily Links for Thursday, April 21, 2016:

Senate Library (University of London) Provides Interactive Shakespeare Timeline Online (Infodocket) This is great for fans of the Bard!

He Used the Internet‚ÄĒI Used the Encyclopedia (Huffington Post) An interesting look at the tools used in college, then and now….

Plastiq lets you pay any bill with your credit or debit card just by snapping a photo (Techcrunch) This sounds really easy and could change the way we pay bills.

ICYMI: These 7 words and phrases from the Web are heading into the dictionary (The Next Web) Acronyms from the online world continues to become more and more mainstream.

Mexico City is crowdsourcing its new constitution using Change.org in a democracy experiment (Quartz) This is a fascinating first. It will be interesting to see the results of this.

Your PC has malware! Here’s how to remove it (PCWorld) Do you know what to do if you get a virus or malware? There’s some helpful links here for diagnosing infections as well.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Named of the Dragon by Susanna Kearsley for $1.99 ans well as books by John Hart.

In Today’s Deals, there’s an Origami R5-01W General Purpose 4-Shelf Steel Collapsible Storage Rack with Wheels and a deal for savings of up to 50% off select Onkyo 7.2-Channel Network A/V Receivers.¬†

Amazon id now offering the 8 GB¬†$50 Fire in colors! Besides black, you can get blue, magenta and tangerine. The 16 GB version is only $20.00 more. And don’t ¬†forget to protect your investment with a case! There are lots of cases, covers and accessories to choose from for 50% off.

Amazon is still offering savings on the Fire HD 6, and deals on pre-owned Fire tablets. I am also still seeing the option for 5 payments of $58 for the Kindle Oasis pre-order.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is One Thing Stolen by Beth Kephart for 2.99. The Romance Daily Find is Small Town Sinners by Melissa Walker for $1.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is¬†The Last Child¬†by John Hart for $2.99.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Cubicles by Camika Spencer for 99 cents.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals – The Internet Really Has Changed Everything: Here’s the Proof

daily_links_1Today, a case study in how the internet has changed our lives, an opinion piece on whether the e-reader is about to make a comeback and news about how a deal with DC Comics means more digital availability. In deals, you can find watches, anime DVDs and a deal on an Anker portable charger.

Daily Links for Wednesday, April 20, 2016:

5 Gmail hacks that help you master your messages (PC World) Tips to help you get a lot more out of your inbox.

9 settings every new iPhone owner should change (CNET) These tweaks will improve the performance and battery life of your phone.

The Internet Really Has Changed Everything: Here’s the Proof (Backchannel)¬†This is a long, fascinating introspective read. A journalist reflects on how technology has¬†changed things¬†his tiny, rural hometown.

Is the e-book reader about to stage a comeback? (The Bookseller) Interesting opinion piece on whether e-readers are really in their death throes.

DC COMICS Reaches New Deal For eBook Distribution Worldwide (Newsarama) There are a lot of comics coming! Overdrive also announces the comics are now available for libraries to purchase.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes The Fire Sermon by Francesca Haig for $1.99.

In Today’s Deals, ¬†¬†we have men’s and women’s Stuhrling Original watches. ¬†Anime lovers, you can also get up to 61% off “Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” and “Steins Gate: The Complete Series” DVD sets and an¬†Anker PowerCore 13000 Portable Charger.

Amazon is still offering savings on the Fire HD 6, and deals on pre-owned Fire tablets. I am also still seeing the option for 5 payments of $58 for the Kindle Oasis pre-order.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Fiesta of Smoke by Suzan Still for $2.99. The Romance Daily Find is The Bradens (Books 1-3 Boxed Sets) by Melissa Foster for $2.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is¬†Jewels of the Sun (Gallaghers of Ardmore Trilogy, Book #1) by Nora Roberts for $1.99.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Exiles in the Garden by Ward Just for $2.99.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Why the Internet isn‚Äôt making us smarter ‚Äď and how to fight back

interent_educateBy David Dunning, University of Michigan

In the hours since I first sat down to write this piece, my laptop tells me the National Basketball Association has had to deny that it threatened to cancel its 2017 All-Star Game over a new anti-LGBT law in North Carolina ‚Äď a story repeated by many news sources including the Associated Press. The authenticity of that viral video of a bear chasing a female snowboarder in Japan has been called into question. And, no, Ted Cruz is not married to his third cousin. It‚Äôs just one among an onslaught of half-truths and even pants-on-fire lies coming as we rev up for the 2016 American election season.

The longer I study human psychology, the more impressed I am with the rich tapestry of knowledge each of us owns. We each have a brainy weave of facts, figures, rules and stories that allows us to address an astonishing range of everyday challenges. Contemporary research celebrates just how vast, organized, interconnected and durable that knowledge base is.

That’s the good news. The bad news is that our brains overdo it. Not only do they store helpful and essential information, they are also receptive to false belief and misinformation.

Just in biology alone, many people believe that spinach is a good source of iron (sorry, Popeye), that we use less than 10 percent of our brains (no, it’s too energy-guzzling to allow that), and that some people suffer hypersensitivity to electromagnetic radiation (for which there is no scientific evidence).

But here‚Äôs the more concerning news. Our access to information, both good and bad, has only increased as our fingertips have gotten into the act. With computer keyboards and smartphones, we now have access to an Internet containing a vast store of information much bigger than any individual brain can carry ‚Äď and that‚Äôs not always a good thing.

Better access doesn’t mean better information

This access to the Internet’s far reaches should permit us to be smarter and better informed. People certainly assume it. A recent Yale study showed that Internet access causes people to hold inflated, illusory impressions of just how smart and well-informed they are.

But there’s a twofold problem with the Internet that compromises its limitless promise.

First, just like our brains, it is receptive to misinformation. In fact, the World Economic Forum lists ‚Äúmassive digital misinformation‚ÄĚ as a main threat to society. A survey of 50 ‚Äúweight loss‚ÄĚ websites found that only three provided sound diet advice. Another of roughly 150 YouTube videos about vaccination found that only half explicitly supported the procedure.

Rumor-mongers, politicians, vested interests, a sensationalizing media and people with intellectual axes to grind all inject false information into the Internet.

So do a lot of well-intentioned but misinformed people. In fact, a study published in the January 2016 Proceedings of National Academy of Science documented just how quickly dubious conspiracy theories spread across the Internet. Specifically, the researchers compared how quickly these rumors spread across Facebook relative to stories on scientific discoveries. Both conspiracy theories and scientific news spread quickly, with the majority of diffusion via Facebook for both types of stories happening within a day.

Making matters worse, misinformation is hard to distinguish from accurate fact. It often has the exact look and feel as the truth. In a series of studies Elanor Williams, Justin Kruger and I published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 2013, we asked students to solve problems in intuitive physics, logic and finance. Those who consistently relied on false facts or principles ‚Äď and thus gave the exact same wrong answer to every problem ‚Äď expressed just as much confidence in their conclusions as those who answered every single problem right.

For example, those who always thought a ball would continue to follow a curved path after rolling out of a bent tube (not true) were virtually as certain as people who knew the right answer (the ball follows a straight path).

Defend yourself

So, how so we separate Internet truth from the false?

First, don’t assume misinformation is obviously distinguishable from true information. Be careful. If the matter is important, perhaps you can start your search with the Internet; just don’t end there. Consult and consider other sources of authority. There is a reason why your doctor suffered medical school, why your financial advisor studied to gain that license.

Second, don’t do what conspiracy theorists did in the Facebook study. They readily spread stories that already fit their worldview. As such, they practiced confirmation bias, giving credence to evidence supporting what they already believed. As a consequence, the conspiracy theories they endorsed burrowed themselves into like-minded Facebook communities who rarely questioned their authenticity.

Instead, be a skeptic. Psychological research shows that groups designating one or two of its members to play devil‚Äôs advocates ‚Äď questioning whatever conclusion the group is leaning toward ‚Äď make for better-reasoned decisions of greater quality.

If no one else is around, it pays to be your own devil’s advocate. Don’t just believe what the Internet has to say; question it. Practice a disconfirmation bias. If you’re looking up medical information about a health problem, don’t stop at the first diagnosis that looks right. Search for alternative possibilities.

Seeking evidence to the contrary

In addition, look for ways in which that diagnosis might be wrong. Research shows that ‚Äúconsidering the opposite‚ÄĚ ‚Äď actively asking how a conclusion might be wrong ‚Äď is a valuable exercise for reducing unwarranted faith in a conclusion.

After all, you should listen to Mark Twain, who, according to a dozen different websites, warned us, ‚ÄúBe careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.‚ÄĚ

Wise words, except a little more investigation reveals more detailed and researched sources with evidence that it wasn’t Mark Twain, but German physician Markus Herz who said them. I’m not surprised; in my Internet experience, I’ve learned to be wary of Twain quotes (Will Rogers, too). He was a brilliant wit, but he gets much too much credit for quotable quips.

Misinformation and true information often look awfully alike. The key to an informed life may not require gathering information as much as it does challenging the ideas you already have or have recently encountered. This may be an unpleasant task, and an unending one, but it is the best way to ensure that your brainy intellectual tapestry sports only true colors.

The Conversationby David Dunning, Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Posted under a  CC license.

Daily Links and Deals: There Are Some Super Shady Things in Oculus Rift’s Terms of Service

daily_links_1In today’s stories, includes¬†news about how we capitalize the word internet, how to encrypt your your iOS or Android device and some really scary clauses in Oculus Rift’s TOS. In the deals for today, how about a deal on a 4K TV?

Daily Links for Sunday, April 3, 2016:

The death of ‚ÄėInternet‚Äô¬†(Techcrunch) They mean the capitalization of¬†the word, not the internet itself.

This may be the funniest ‘don’t text and drive’ ad you’ve ever seen (CNET) This is not your usual PSA.

There Are Some Super Shady Things in Oculus Rift’s Terms of Service (Gizmodo) Whoa! And this is why we should *ALWAYS* read the TOS.

How to encrypt your iOS or Android device (CNET) Here’s a primer on keeping your personal data protected.

Freebie Alert! SAGE Offers Free Full Text Access to All of Their 940+ Journals This Month (Infodocket) These encompass the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Science, Technology, and Medicine. Offer ends April 30, 2016.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon’s selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes Hunting Shadows: An Inspector Ian Rutledge Mystery by Charles Todd for $1.99.

In¬†Today’s Deals, Amazon is offering a¬†Samsung UN55JU6500 55-Inch 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV (2015 Model) for $719.99. They also still have¬†deals on Fire tablets: You can get 30% off the Fire HD (it‚Äôs $69.99). This is my favorite fire and you can read my review here. Amazon is also offering pre-owned Fire tablets starting at $29.98.¬†ūüôā

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin for $1.99.The Romance Daily Find is The Forgotten Recipe by Amy Clipston for $1.99.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is an interesting sounding alternate history story:¬†The Darkest Hour¬†by Tony Schumacher for 99 cents.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell by Aldous Huxley for $1.99.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.

Daily Links and Deals: E-books are more than just digital facsimiles, and publishers need to realize that, pronto

daily_links_1In today’s links, we have news on the potential of ebooks, DVD screeners, burner cell phones and much more. ¬†Today’s book deals include series starters in SF and romance and a Kobo Supersale.

Daily Links for Sunday, March 27, 2016:

Original DVD screeners widely available on eBay ¬† (Torrent Freak) All the MPAA’s piracy measures are facing an overwhelming tide of opposition.

E-books are more than just digital facsimiles, and publishers need to realize that, pronto (Techcrunch) Are publishers taking full advantage of what the ebook format has to offer?

A new bill seeks to kill anonymous ‚Äėburner‚Äô phones by requiring registration (The Next Web) Obviously, the persona who sponsored this bill has never heard or stalkers or domestic abuse. There are legitimate reasons to want a burner phone.

Advertising’s hottest surveillance software is surprisingly legal (Engadget) ¬†This is so creepy….

The 50-year digital relationship (Techcrunch) No, the Internet is not going away. It’s really too much a part of our lives at this point.

How Musicians Deal With Smartphone-Obsessed Crowds During Shows (Vocativ) How our smartphones have changed music performance.

Deals of the Day:

Amazon‚Äôs selection of Kindle Daily Deals includes¬†Wizard’s First Rule (Sword of Truth Book 1)¬†by Terry Goodkind for $1.99.

The Barnes and Noble Nook Daily Find is It’s Not What You Think: Why Christianity Is About So Much More Than Going to Heaven When You Die¬†by Jefferson Bethke for $1.99. The Romance Daily Find is¬†Wonderful Lonesome (Amish Turns of Time Series #1)¬†by Olivia Newport for 99 cents.

Barnes and Noble is still running several promotions‚ÄĚ First, you can take 50% or more off teen bestseller Nook books.¬†They are also running a special where you can get a¬†NOOK Bundle Offer: 10‚Ä≥ NOOK Device, Free Screen Film and Free Cover of Your Choice- a $330+ Value for Just $199.99. And finally, you can take 25% off all Nook Accessories.

Kobo’s Daily Deal¬†is¬†Room¬†by Emma Donoghue for $2.99.

In other deals, Kobo is having a Supersale, offering up to 80% off and  5X Super Points on all purchases. And, continuing through March 28, Kobo is still featuring  bestsellling memoirs for $2.99 and under.

iTunes’ Weekly Bestsellers Under $4 includes Lady Macbeth by Susan Fraser King for $1.99.

(A note on Daily Deals: All prices current at the time of posting and subject to change. Most items marked Daily Deals are good for only the day posted.

Many large promotions have discount pricing that is set by the publisher. This usually means that titles can be found at a discount price across most platforms (with iTunes sometimes being the exception). If you have a favorite retailer you like to patronize, check the title on that website. There is a good chance that they will be matching the sale price.)


Daily Links are interesting links I discover as I go about my online day. The frequency and number of links posted depend upon the daily news. I also post other, different links of interest on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Google Plus eBook Evangelist Page.